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Will they tell my parents?

Find out about confidential sexual health services, including contraception, testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and advice on unplanned pregnancy, even if you're under 16 years old. Sexual health services (contraception and pregnancy advice, or tests for STIs, including HIV) are free and confidential. If…

Should I volunteer?

There's good evidence that volunteering brings benefits to both the person volunteering and the people and organisations they support. Volunteering involves spending unpaid time doing something to help other people or groups, other than (or as well as) close relatives. Evidence suggests that volunteering brings health benefits to…

How do I change to a different pill?

If you want advice about changing your contraceptive pill, you can visit your GP, contraceptive nurse (sometimes called a family planning nurse), or sexual health clinic. You should not have a break between different packs, so you will usually be advised to start the new…

Learning disabilities: help your child learn

If your child has a learning disability, there are steps you can take to help them learn. Local support services may be able to guide you along the way and help you work out how best to communicate to aid their learning. If your child…

Puberty info for parents

It might have been a while since you went through puberty, so use these resources if you need a refresher on exactly what happens and when. Some of the information can also give you advice on how to get over your embarrassment and talk openly…

How to spot child sexual exploitation

Each year in England thousands of children and young people are raped or sexually abused. This includes children who have been abducted and trafficked, or beaten, threatened or bribed into having sex. Media coverage of police investigations into the crimes of Jimmy Savile and other…

Care and support: what's changing?

Since the Care Act 2014, the way people receive care and support has changed to be more consistent across England. The changes in the Care Act are designed to put you in control of the help you receive. Any decisions about your care and support will…

Treating a fever (high temperature) in children

In children under five, a fever is considered to be a temperature of 38C (100.4F) or above. Fever is very common in young children. More than 60% of parents with children aged between six months and five years say their child has had one. It's usually caused by…

Children with a serious condition or special needs

Find out what support is available, and how to get it, if your child has a serious condition or special needs. Learning that your child has a disability or illness is bound to be stressful and upsetting. It's a good idea to get as much information as…

Stages of puberty: what happens to boys and girls

Puberty is when a child's body begins to develop and change as they become an adult. Girls develop breasts and start their periods, and boys develop a deeper voice and start to look like men. The average age for girls to begin puberty is 11,…